ACADEMIC TOPICS

Section 11

Section 11 refers to Section 11 of the Securities Act, formally 15 U.S.C. § 77k, which allows purchasers of a security in a public offering to bring a civil action against the issuer, underwriter, or anyone who signed or helped prepare the...

Section 5

Section 5 commonly refers to Section 5 of the Securities Act, formally 15 U.S.C. § 77e, which requires issuers to file a registration statement when publicly offering securities.

Section 5 Regulations

Section 5 seeks to...

Securities fraud

Securities fraud is the misrepresentation or omission of information to induce investors into trading securities.

Overview

While always actionable under common law fraud, Congress, the Securities and Exchange Commission (...

Seduction

Seduction, in law, refers to an act by which a person entices another to have unlawful sexual intercourse with them by means of persuasions, promises, flattery or bribes without using any physical force or violence.

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See

In formal legal writing, a signal indicating that the cited source clearly supports the preceding statement, even though an inference is required to draw the connection. If the statement repeats an idea directly from the source or quotes the source,...

See also

In formal legal writing, a signal indicating that the cited source provides additional support for the statement after primary supporting sources have already been cited. Thus, see also citations most appropriately follow sources that have been cited...

See generally

A signal indicating that the cited source contains helpful background material. In this way, a reader searching for an overview of the general topic under discussion can know a good place to look.

Seisin

A legal concept from early English property law that continues to influence certain concepts in the modern law of real property and is thus helpful and, at times, essential to understanding this area of the law. In brief, the term refers to the...

Self-serving

Self-serving, in a legal context, refers to a statement or answer to a question that serves no purpose and provides no evidence, but only argues or reinforces the legal position of a particular party in a lawsuit. The courts have consistently...

Separate But Equal

“Separate but equal” refers to the infamously racist decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) that allowed the use of segregation laws by states and local governments. The phrase “separate but equal” comes from part of the Court’...

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